Master of Science in Project Management – Portland

Program Overview

The Master of Science in Project Management provides students with the practical skills and theoretical concepts needed to lead complex projects. Students learn every step of the process: project definition, cost and risk estimation, schedule planning and monitoring, budget management, negotiation and conflict resolution, project leadership, and project presentation and evaluation. Featuring real-world case studies, the program presents techniques and tools for managing long- and short-term projects, successfully and cost effectively. Augmenting the core project management courses are concentrations that provide students with content-specific expertise—enabling them to deepen their knowledge in their field of interest. 

The Master of Science in Project Management prepares learners as project management practitioners capable of applying project management processes with technical, professional, and strategic expertise. With emphasis on experiential learning, the program provides dynamic opportunities for learners with varying degrees of work experience to practice their knowledge both globally and collaboratively while implementing traditional and innovative project management concepts for real-life and complex projects. 

All Roux Institute programs provide content relevant to the urgent and emerging needs of industry in Maine and the rapidly evolving regional, national, and global economy. Opportunities for experiential learning will be concentrated in Portland, the state of Maine, and the Northeast region. Students are encouraged to pursue co-ops and special virtual Experiential Network projects with the institute’s founding corporate partners, a group of leading employers in Maine. 

  • Portland

    Location

  • Full-Time
    Part-Time

    Commitment

  • 12-18 months

    Duration of Program

Unique Features

  • Option to engage in experiential learning through the co-op program and/or Experiential Network projects.
  • Program curriculum can be tailored to student's past professional experience with project management.
  • Concentrations allow students to focus their study on content-specific knowledge.
  • The program content is designed to prepare students for the high-demand jobs and industry needs in Portland, the state of Maine, and the Northeast region.
  • This is a STEM-designated graduate degree.
  • The program is delivered through a hybrid model of online and on-site learning.

Program Objectives

  • Specialized Knowledge – Effectively lead and manage sometimes interrelated, complex projects in a mature manner while avoiding common project management pitfalls.
  • Broad, Integrative Knowledge – Manage project scope, risk, quality, and performance metrics while effectively communicating with all project stakeholders.
  • Civic Learning – Understand the need for ethics and social responsibility in the practice of project management as outlined in the PMI Code of Ethics.
  • Intellectual Skills – Develop the critical-thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills necessary to lead projects in a complex and dynamic project environment.

Accreditation Description

In October of 2016, the Master of Science in Project Management accreditation was re-affirmed for the maximum five-year accreditation cycle (originally accredited in 2009) by the PMI Global Accreditation Center for Project Management Education Programs (GAC), the world's leading association for project management professionals. Accreditation is achieved by meeting the GAC’s rigorous standards, which include an assessment of program objectives and outcomes, a review of onsite and online resources, evaluations of faculty and students, and proof of continuous improvements in the area of project management.

Graduates of our GAC-accredited program are granted a substantial 12-month reduction credit toward the experience requirement when they complete an application for any PMI certification. This means that those applying for the PMI certification will only need 24 months of project management experience, instead of 36 months as outlined by GAC. This new benefit applies retroactively to our program’s initial accreditation date of 2009.

Enrollment Data
Enrolled Students 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
MS in Project Management 962 1059 1188 1249 1362
           
Degrees Conferred 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
MS in Project Management 270 398 386 413 481

Career Outlook

According to the Project Management Institute, through the decade ending in 2020, 15.7 million new project management roles will be created. The profession is expected to grow by $6.61 trillion.  

In the United States, this growth will mean rising salaries and growth in the project-intensive sectors of manufacturing, business services, finance and insurance, oil and gas, information services, construction, and utilities.

In 10 countries (Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, India, Japan, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom) with established or quickly developing project-intensive sectors, project management roles are expected to grow by 13.4 million through 2020. 

Scholarships and aid

$35.3K

Tuition

Estimated Total Tuition

This is an estimate based on the tuition rates for Academic Year 2020-2021 and does not include any fees or other expenses. Some courses and labs have tuition rates that may increase or decrease total tuition. Tuition and fees are subject to revision by the president and Board of Trustees at any time. For more detailed information, please visit Student Financial Services.

Generous scholarships

The Roux Institute is currently offering generous scholarships to meet the financial needs of all students through its Alfond Scholars Initiative. Each award is determined by an individual assessment. And Northeastern alumni receive a Double Husky Scholarship —a tuition discount of 25 percent.

Learn more about the Alfond Scholars Initiative

Corporate tuition benefits

Many employers subsidize education for their employees. Speak with yours about any tuition benefits your company may offer.

Special military scholarships

For military veterans and servicemembers, a limited number of donor-funded scholarships are available even after all other aid has been awarded to help with commuting costs, childcare, and other costs of living.

Learn more about military scholarships

Federal aid

You can apply for federal aid grants and loans through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

Learn about the FAFSA

Admission Requirements

  • Online application
  • Statement of purpose (500–1000 words): Identify your educational goals and expectations of the program. Please be aware that Northeastern University's academic policy on plagiarism applies to your statement of purpose.
  • Professional resumé
  • Unofficial undergraduate transcripts; official transcripts required at the time of admission
  • Two letters of recommendation from individuals who have either academic or professional knowledge of your capabilities such as a faculty member, colleague, or mentor, preferably one from your current employer
  • English language proficiency proof. Students for whom English is not their primary language must submit one of the following:
    • Official associate or bachelor's degree transcript from an accredited college or university in the U.S., stating degree conferral and date
    • TOEFL, IELTS, PTE, Duolingo, or NU Global Exam scores

Admission Dates

Our admissions process operates on a rolling basis; however, we do recommend following the application guidelines below to ensure you can begin during your desired start term.

  • Domestic application complete (First half start: April 12, 2021) April 2, 2021
  • Domestic application complete (Second half start: May 24, 2021) May 14, 2021
  • Domestic application complete (first half start: July 12, 2021) June 28, 2021
  • Domestic application complete (second half start: August 9, 2021) July 26, 2021
  • Domestic application complete (first half start: September 20, 2021) September 7, 2021
  • Domestic application complete (second half start: November 1, 2021) October 18, 2021
  • Domestic application complete (first half start: January 10, 2022) December 20, 2021
  • Domestic application complete (second half start: February 22, 2022) February 8, 2022
  • Domestic application complete (first half start: April 11, 2022) March 28, 2022
  • Domestic application complete (second half start: May 23, 2022) May 9, 2022
  • Domestic application complete (first half start: July 11, 2022) June 27, 2022
  • Domestic application complete (second half start: August 8, 2022) July 25, 2022

Program Curriculum

General Requirements

Master of Science in Project Management General Requirements

Courses and their associated credit hours are listed below.

Based on your experience, complete one of the options below (PJM 5900 is for students with fewer than three years' experience directing or leading project tasks and is recommended for students who do not have a basic working knowledge of Microsoft Project software):

Fewer than 3 years of experience

PJM 5900 - Foundations of Project Management4.00
Examines the differences between general and project management responsibilities. Introduces the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), which provides a structured approach to understanding project process groups and knowledge areas needed to manage any size project through a complete project life cycle. Explains high-level distinctions between project, program, and portfolio management. Includes an introduction to Microsoft Project, which is one of the most widely utilized project management software tools. Strongly recommended for students with little or no formal project management experience.
PJM 6000 - Project Management Practices3.00
Provides an overview of the project management process. Emphasizes project definition, identification of project scope, project life cycle, and project planning. Uses case studies to examine best practices and common project management pitfalls.

3+ years of project management experience

PJM 6000 - Project Management Practices3.00
Provides an overview of the project management process. Emphasizes project definition, identification of project scope, project life cycle, and project planning. Uses case studies to examine best practices and common project management pitfalls.

Complete the following:

PJM 6005 - Project Scope Management3.00
Offers insight into how projects are defined, evaluated, and ultimately translated into manageable project requirements and concrete deliverables. By learning how to identify stakeholder needs and convert those needs into viable, measurable project scope documentation, a project manager can successfully manage not only a project’s scope but also make informed recommendations when trade-offs between project scope, cost, and schedule become necessary.
PJM 6015 - Project Risk Management3.00
Examines quantitative techniques for risk assessment and decision making, as well as the steps and elements of a risk management plan, including the ongoing monitoring of risk factors. The accurate identification of risks, and understanding of how to account for the potential impact of risks, can greatly impact the likelihood of project success.
PJM 6025 - Project Scheduling and Cost Planning3.00
Builds on the project schedule to explore cost estimation methods, break-even analysis, and earned value management. Studies effective tools and techniques that can allow project managers to translate specifications to realistic project plans that lead to a resource-loaded schedule and baseline budget. These tools and techniques can be used to minimize bottlenecks and downtime, identify and plan for resource needs, develop contingencies, and manage risk and scope creep. Topics include schedule development, cost estimating, and cost and schedule management through earned value management. A well-thought-out and well-managed schedule is critical to successful project management and is integral to the efficient management of project costs. Offers students an opportunity to learn to manage the project budget, revise cost estimates, and develop confidence levels.
PJM 6135 - Project Quality Management3.00
Designed to provide detailed instruction in Project Quality Management (PQM) processes, one of the ten knowledge areas outlined in the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge. Discusses how to integrate PQM processes into the overall project plan and how to prepare a PQM plan. Encourages students to work together in a team environment to complete a PQM plan for a project.

The following course should be taken last:

PJM 6910 - Capstone3.00
Offers students an opportunity to utilize all of the project management skills they have acquired in this master’s certificate program to evaluate project processes and outcomes of a single project throughout the entire project life cycle. Examines both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, with an emphasis on tactical approaches and earned value management. Also examines stakeholder analysis and practical techniques for reporting performance results. Intended to be the final course in the project management curriculum after successful completion of all other courses.

Project Management Required Electives

Complete two of the following. Note: Students who take PJM 5900 are required to take only one course in this section:

PJM 6125 - Project Evaluation and Assessment3.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn to develop metrics for determining and reporting project performance. Examines both quantitative and qualitative approaches of evaluation, with an emphasis on earned value management. Examines stakeholder analysis and techniques for reporting performance results.
PJM 6140 - Managing Troubled Projects3.00
Examines how to prevent failed and troubled projects, how to perform a project assessment/audit, how to develop a troubled project recovery plan, and how to develop a failed project shutdown plan. Includes team presentations of case study assignments to gain experience in managing and avoiding failed and troubled projects, one of the most significant assignments for a project manager.
PJM 6145 - Global Project Management3.00
Expands the detailed treatment of project management into the global areas of environmental factors, national differences, cultural differences, outsourcing, and virtual project management. The state of the art in project management has advanced to heavy use of global project management. Addresses the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge practices as applied in the organization and the future of project management.
PJM 6710 - Introduction to Program and Portfolio Management3.00
Examines project, program, and portfolio management with a primary focus on the similarities and distinctions between program management and portfolio management. Offers students an opportunity to develop and evidence a foundational understanding of program and portfolio management and the critical role these play within today’s global environment.
PJM 6075 - Project Finance0.00
Explores real-world cases of project finance across industry sectors (e.g., energy, resource recovery, and mining) to examine how organizations structure their capital to mitigate various project risks and to secure scarce resources in the business environment. Topics include capital structure, discounted cash flow, financial instruments, capital budgeting, cost of capital, risk and return, project agreements, project cost accumulation, project cost allocation, and project investment ranking.Offers students an opportunity to develop a profound understanding of the principles of project finance.

Electives

Complete two of the following:

CMN 6000 - Introduction to Organizational Communication3.00
Considers writing and other forms of communication as a management tool. Addresses how effective writing—in plain English—can shape project plans, motivate people, solve problems, and enhance one’s role as a communicator. Offers students an opportunity to demonstrate their writing and editing skills through research, case study analysis, and composing business-related communications as well as to develop other forms of communication, including oral presentations. As such, the two major goals of this course are to acquaint students with a step-by-step communication methodology and to provide them with an opportunity to develop and polish their writing and communication skills.
CMN 6005 - Foundations of Professional Communication0.00
Focuses on comprehensive reading and written communication from both academic and professional perspectives and integrates best practices in both. The key to success in any professional field is the ability to communicate effectively. Offers students an opportunity to evaluate personal adaptation to a new cultural and educational setting, including the use of learning resources.
CMN 6060 - Negotiation, Mediation, and Facilitation3.00
Introduces the techniques of dispute resolution. Emphasizes the processes of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation. Examines techniques suggested by practitioners and researchers regarding best practices for effective negotiation. A central part of the course requires students to participate in and evaluate negotiation simulations.
CMN 6090 - Organizational Culture, Climate, and Communication3.00
Examines the relationship between organizational culture and communication and discusses the advantages and elements of a supportive communication climate. Some researchers believe that the culture of the organization drives the communication quality in an organization. Examines both case analysis and academic research to address common problems pertaining to cultivating supportive communication climates and methods for improving these climates.
CMN 6095 - Foundations of Developing Cultural Awareness3.00
Examines culture from three pillars: awareness, language, and history/politics. Offers students an opportunity to investigate their personal identity and barriers by incorporating two assessments to determine personal implicit bias and cultural intelligence. Interpretations are constructed from self-reports employing the cultural intelligence (CQ) assessment and Implicit Bias Project. Focuses on the impact of languages on cultures. By identifying nonstandard language and discussing the meaning of words across different languages, offers students an opportunity to gain understanding and formulate sensitivity when communicating with different audiences, albeit intergenerational and/or international. Examines the impact of history and politics on cultural groups, specifically as related to cross-cultural communication. The written signature assignment is a personal reflection analysis on insights gained throughout the course and career aspirations.
CMN 6110 - Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Conflict: Meeting Management3.00
Examines common problems with organization meetings and intervention techniques that can be employed to reduce the tensions associated with such interaction. Discusses methods used for evaluating individual members in meeting contexts. A central part of the course involves participation in and evaluation of meeting interaction.
COP 6940 - Personal and Career Development4.00
Offers a companion course to an internship or co-op. Offers students an opportunity to use the work experience along with this course to (1) clarify vision of a successful professional and personal future and identify goals to creating that vision; (2) identify strengths, weaknesses, and communication and conflict-management preferences; (3) design a career action plan; and (4) develop and practice articulating professional goals, personal brand, and knowledge and experience gained from the co-op. Encourages students to engage in a combination of (1) introspection; (2) critical reflection on experiences in the workplace and with online collaborative learning and group behavior; (3) learning to identify and analyze career and personal development opportunities in the external environment; and (4) practicing communication, relationship building, conflict management, and leadership skills. Requires permission of the CPS Office of Cooperative Education.
INT 6943 - Integrative Experiential Learning3.00
Offers students an opportunity to clarify their vision of a successful professional future, identify goals to achieve that vision, and assess career growth opportunities. Explores how to frame a growth strategy using internal and external scanning mechanisms, negotiation and persuasion, research, and critical reflection. Students refine an applied research topic, perform research, develop recommendations for addressing a key performance area within their existing workplace, and create a plan for implementing their recommendations. Students review “lessons learned” and incorporate suggestions from this review to improve and finalize their integrated plan. With permission from their host organization, students may go on to implement elements of their project in a current or upcoming project, where feedback is provided from stakeholders, including their corporate sponsor.
INT 6940 - Experiential Learning Projects for Professionals4.00
Offers students an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills gained through their master’s program to work on challenging short-term projects under faculty supervision. Students are matched with discipline-specific consulting projects provided by a wide range of sponsoring organizations in the private and nonprofit sectors. Students develop a project plan, conduct research, develop and deliver recommendations to sponsoring organizations, and reflect on lessons learned. Mapping academic course concepts and skills to the consultative process is a primary learning goal. Requires an application process.
PJM 6205 - Leading and Managing Technical Projects3.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn about leadership and management skills and strategies needed to succeed in a demanding technical project environment. Many project managers understand the technical aspects of a particular project environment but lack these critical management and leadership skills. Topics covered include understanding the technical environment, managing and motivating team members, understanding organizational culture, interpersonal strategies, and developing a personal leadership approach.

Concentrations

Choose one from the following:

PJM 6810 - Principles of Agile Project Management3.00
Provides an overview of the fundamentals of agile project management. Topics include agile vs. traditional approaches, the agile manifesto, and the development of agile as a value-added business practice. Introduces key agile project management practices, including communication management planning and risk-management planning. Reviews agile-specific practices and method tailoring from an application perspective. Investigates agile project management tools.
PJM 6815 - Advanced Agile Project Management3.00
Constitutes an advanced offering focusing on specific approaches to executing projects in an agile environment. Seeks to provide the student with a firm grounding and an applied, experiential understanding of specific agile approaches. Offers students an opportunity to engage in real-world-oriented case studies to evidence a strong understanding of the methodologies in a practical, experiential manner by planning and simulating an agile project using a methodology taught in the course.
PJM 6820 - Agile Implementation and Governance3.00
Explores the implementation of agile within an organization and the governance structure to support agile projects. Studies the use of change management techniques to address stakeholder needs as the organization moves from a traditional to agile or blended approach to projects. Reviews and applies advanced topics in program/ portfolio management in agile environments. Offers students an opportunity to develop an implementation strategy and governance plan.
PJM 6825 - Agile Lean Product Development3.00
Offers a practical overview of modern lean/agile product exposure based on contemporary industry practice. To win in today’s competitive market requires giving your business the ability to deliver highly profitable products faster than the competition. Covers the complete life cycle of product management, from identifying customers and users through to sales, marketing, and managing teams. Covers how to minimize investment and output while maximizing the information discovered in order to support effective decision making.
PJM 6205 - Leading and Managing Technical Projects3.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn about leadership and management skills and strategies needed to succeed in a demanding technical project environment. Many project managers understand the technical aspects of a particular project environment but lack these critical management and leadership skills. Topics covered include understanding the technical environment, managing and motivating team members, understanding organizational culture, interpersonal strategies, and developing a personal leadership approach.
CMG 6400 - Introduction to Construction Management4.00
Seeks to provide a foundation in both technical skills and individual written and verbal communication for construction project managers. Since students come to the program from a variety of educational and experience backgrounds, offers students an opportunity to be assessed and brought to the level necessary for successful completion of the program. Topics covered include construction documentation, including specifications and drawings; the preconstruction processes required for planning; and construction operations needed for successful operations and control, including estimating, cost control, and change-order management. Students practice scheduling techniques, progress monitoring, and reporting approaches for projects and are introduced to construction organizations, contractor selection, and project procurement.
CMG 6402 - Alternative Project Delivery Methods and Project Controls4.00
Offers a comprehensive overview of alternative project delivery systems in public and private sectors. Topics include project life cycle; alternative project design, including building information modeling (BIM); schedule; cost and value management; project and program management; project closeout; and innovative procurement strategies. Also examines international projects, contracts, terminations, defaults, and sustainable and integrated project delivery (IPD) as vehicles to ensure the meeting of project objectives. Uses case studies and real-world examples to identify and practice the leadership skills required for successful project execution.
CMG 6403 - Safety, Project Risk, and Quality Management4.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn how to develop and manage a risk identification, analysis, and response plan. Students look at project participants and several construction processes with a focus on the safety, risk, and quality impacts on those processes. Covers the latest techniques to ensure that a project provides a safe environment for everyone. Studies the analytical tools necessary to ensure customer satisfaction in the area of quality and examines both quality control and assurance processes.
CMG 6405 - Construction Law4.00
Explores the statutory and legal context of contracts in construction. Covers business ethics and examines the legal issues that may result in bidding mistakes and construction disputes over such matters as differing expectations regarding specifications and plans, time and schedule impacts, delays and acceleration, change orders, and differing and unforeseen conditions. Explores some areas of warranties and guarantees; joint liability; and contract-dispute resolution, including negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, and litigation.
LDR 6100 - Developing Your Leadership Capability6.00
Begins with the premise everyone is capable of exercising leadership. Establishes this premise by exposing students to a series of alternative perspectives of leadership, including some contemporary collaborative models. Offers students an opportunity to demonstrate a holistic perspective of leadership by gaining an appreciation for the self and how it relates to the greater world around them. Students take a series of professional and leadership assessments/instruments designed to increase their self-awareness. This information allows students to think critically about their own leadership abilities and determine where they fit within the leadership continuum. Offers students an opportunity to build a personal model of leadership that can be put to immediate use in their workplace.
LDR 6110 - Leading Teams6.00
Offers students an opportunity to lead teams through all stages of team development, learn and overcome team challenges, and determine the principles of building high-performing teams while nurturing the cohesion and bonding of team members. The team is the unit of an organization where most leaders begin to develop influence skills. Leading teams involves managing different personalities, cultures, and varying skill levels, while simultaneously securing resources and managing expectations of stakeholders. In this course, students also have an opportunity to learn effective techniques for working with virtual teams, managing conflict in teams, and facilitating team problem solving.
LDR 6120 - Developing Organizational Success through Leadership Development6.00
Focuses on developing leadership capacity, or bench strength, throughout an organization. Understanding organizational dynamics and developing leadership capacity within the organization are two critical challenges facing leaders today. Studies best practices for onboarding, developing, coaching, and mentoring leaders, as well as the systems, practices, and procedures required to develop leaders throughout an organization. Students participate in a coaching exercise, where they give and receive coaching from their peers in the program and from faculty.
LDR 6150 - Innovation and Organizational Transformation3.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn the framework for organizational transformation and obtain the skills and competencies required to develop and implement a holistic model of change. The strategies incorporate revealing the problems that ask to be solved, designing what the future change will look like, assessing the current situation in relation to the desired change, and planning and managing the transition from the current situation to the desired future. Within this course, students serve as consultants for real-life organizations, helping managers in their endeavors for organizational transformation. From these discussions, students have an opportunity to develop a personal model for change leadership and define an action plan for personal growth as a change agent.
PJM 6205 - Leading and Managing Technical Projects3.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn about leadership and management skills and strategies needed to succeed in a demanding technical project environment. Many project managers understand the technical aspects of a particular project environment but lack these critical management and leadership skills. Topics covered include understanding the technical environment, managing and motivating team members, understanding organizational culture, interpersonal strategies, and developing a personal leadership approach.
PJM 6210 - Communication Skills for Project Managers3.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn strategies for communicating technical concepts in a clear, concise, and appropriate manner for both written and oral communication media. In all project environments, communication is critical for project success. The ability to craft project reports and to communicate with customers, clients, team members, and company executives is critical for anyone leading technical projects. Often, the project manager needs to communicate technical data to a nontechnical audience. Explores various communication models and approaches with a focus on applying those models in a real-world context.
PJM 6215 - Leading Remote Project Teams3.00
Offers students an opportunity to learn strategies for creating a cohesive, high-performing project team in a remote project environment. The challenges of leading a remote project team are apparent to anyone who has attempted it. The technological challenges are complicated by the reality that most teams have participants located around the world. Therefore, we face not only the standard fare of interpersonal challenges but also cultural challenges as well.
PJM 6810 - Principles of Agile Project Management3.00
Provides an overview of the fundamentals of agile project management. Topics include agile vs. traditional approaches, the agile manifesto, and the development of agile as a value-added business practice. Introduces key agile project management practices, including communication management planning and risk-management planning. Reviews agile-specific practices and method tailoring from an application perspective. Investigates agile project management tools.
PJM 6825 - Agile Lean Product Development3.00
Offers a practical overview of modern lean/agile product exposure based on contemporary industry practice. To win in today’s competitive market requires giving your business the ability to deliver highly profitable products faster than the competition. Covers the complete life cycle of product management, from identifying customers and users through to sales, marketing, and managing teams. Covers how to minimize investment and output while maximizing the information discovered in order to support effective decision making.
CMN 6000 - Introduction to Organizational Communication3.00
Considers writing and other forms of communication as a management tool. Addresses how effective writing—in plain English—can shape project plans, motivate people, solve problems, and enhance one’s role as a communicator. Offers students an opportunity to demonstrate their writing and editing skills through research, case study analysis, and composing business-related communications as well as to develop other forms of communication, including oral presentations. As such, the two major goals of this course are to acquaint students with a step-by-step communication methodology and to provide them with an opportunity to develop and polish their writing and communication skills.
INT 6000 - Writing Lab1.00
Requires students to analyze and draft writing assignments from topics covered in graduate level courses.
PJM 6610 - Foundations of Project Business Analysis0.00
Offers a framework of business analysis. Topics include the role of the business analyst in the current organizational environment, understanding the business need, working with key stakeholders to identify the benefits of the project, and strategies to lead the organizational change necessary to harvest value.
PJM 6620 - Project Business Analysis: Needs Assessment0.00
Focuses on specific approaches to understand the needs of customers who receive project solutions. Discusses techniques for uncovering and confirming the product scope that result in meeting project goals. Applies analytical thinking techniques to ensure solutions meet customer needs.
PJM 6630 - Project Business Analysis: Requirements Planning and Analysis0.00
Explores tools and techniques to convert customer needs into solution designs. Beginning with the current and future state of the project’s product, applies tools and techniques to create, review, and prioritize requirements.
ALY 6000 - Introduction to Analytics3.00
Offers an overview of analytics concepts and practices across a diverse range of industries and organizational contexts. Provides a hands-on introduction to statistics, data management, and the R scripting language. Technical projects based on introductory statistics and the R language offer students an opportunity to understand and apply the theories, practices, and application of analytics to real-world problems. An initial exploration of data sets illustrates how fundamental data analysis can impact decision making at both the strategic and operational level. Students research case studies to examine careers and professional opportunities in both for-profit and nonprofit industry segments.
PJM 6640 - Leadership Strategies for the Business Analyst0.00
Introduces the techniques applied by the business analyst to work with stakeholders in the requirements process. Emphasizes the processes of facilitation, communication, problem solving, consensus building, and negotiation. A central part of the course requires students to participate in and evaluate facilitated simulations.
ALY 6000 - Introduction to Analytics3.00
Offers an overview of analytics concepts and practices across a diverse range of industries and organizational contexts. Provides a hands-on introduction to statistics, data management, and the R scripting language. Technical projects based on introductory statistics and the R language offer students an opportunity to understand and apply the theories, practices, and application of analytics to real-world problems. An initial exploration of data sets illustrates how fundamental data analysis can impact decision making at both the strategic and operational level. Students research case studies to examine careers and professional opportunities in both for-profit and nonprofit industry segments.
ALY 6010 - Probability Theory and Introductory Statistics3.00
Introduces statistics for business analytics from an analysis-of-data viewpoint. Topics include frequency distributions; measures of location; mean, median, mode; measures of dispersion, variance, graphic presentation; elementary probability; populations and samples; sampling distributions; and categorical data. Includes a preliminary introduction to regression and correlation. Uses statistical software (for data analysis during analytic project assignments) to provide a hands-on experience to observe how probability and statistics, scripting, and basic data management impact decision making at all levels within a corporation.
ALY 6015 - Intermediate Analytics3.00
Builds on the foundation provided in ALY 6000 and ALY 6010 by exploring at greater depth the tools of data correction and recoding, as well as those of statistics and R. Offers students an opportunity to learn to discern and validate meaningful and statistically significant patterns in data through sound applications of the scientific method. Emphasizes initial mastery of correlation and regression, ANOVA, GLM, and logistic regression. Introduces the more advanced techniques of multivariable regression and nonparametric statistics and sampling. The goal of this course is to offer students an opportunity to master the fundamental skills of data management, analysis, and communication, which are the core data analytical competencies required of today’s analytic professionals.
ALY 6070 - Communication and Visualization for Data Analytics3.00
Offers an interdisciplinary examination of design concepts and cognitive and communication theories that support effective practices for data visualization and communication. Considers the relationship between information and audience and studies effective techniques in the written, spoken, and visual communication of complex quantitative information. Project-based activities offer students opportunities to apply these techniques in a manner that makes data understandable, compelling, and actionable. Introduces R Shiny, Tableau and R in the lab sessions as the tool for data visualization.

Experiential Learning

Learning integrated with professional experience is a hallmark of Northeastern and the Roux Institute. Students gain a clear understanding of real-world industry needs in Portland, the state of Maine, and the Northeast—and valued workplace skills like communication and teamwork—through assignments at companies and nonprofit organizations. Students can complete a six-week virtual project relevant to their studies through the university’s Experiential Network (XN) of employers, or even for their own company. Or they can apply for four- and six-month, full-time co-op positions. All opportunities enable students to build their resumés, expand their professional networks, and chart a path to in-demand careers.

Contact us to explore your options.

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